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Snider

Hey y’all, 

This week has been the first week back after the Christmas holidays, so our dev updates will be back to their usual length from here on out. This week, the Session team worked to finish the final Session protocol implementation, specifically focusing on closed groups. The Lokinet team submitted their TUN refactor code which is expected to improve performance, especially on Windows. The Loki Core team worked on various Oxen rebranding projects, mostly focusing on the wallets. 


Loki Core 


Lokinet 

This past week, Lokinet development resumed with significant work on a big “TUN refactor” PR (fTUN is the name of the programmable virtual network interface driver that Lokinet uses to provide local virtual addresses). This throws away a big chunk of borrowed code in favour of a streamlined implementation, which is always nice, but more importantly it fixes a longstanding issue with Windows performance where we have continually seen considerably worse throughput and latency numbers on Windows compared to Linux or macOS. We still have more testing and some known issues to stamp out, but we hope to get release 8.1.3 out, particularly for Windows users, in the near future.


Session

We’re finishing off the remaining Session Protocol changes this week. This primarily means changing closed groups to use the Session Protocol instead of our implementation of sender keys.

Session iOS 

Session Android 

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #133 appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Hey y’all, 

This week has been the first week back after the Christmas holidays, so our dev updates will be back to their usual length from here on out. This week, the Session team worked to finish the final Session protocol implementation, specifically focusing on closed groups. The Lokinet team submitted their TUN refactor code which is expected to improve performance, especially on Windows. The Loki Core team worked on various Oxen rebranding projects, mostly focusing on the wallets. 


Loki Core 


Lokinet 

This past week, Lokinet development resumed with significant work on a big “TUN refactor” PR (fTUN is the name of the programmable virtual network interface driver that Lokinet uses to provide local virtual addresses). This throws away a big chunk of borrowed code in favour of a streamlined implementation, which is always nice, but more importantly it fixes a longstanding issue with Windows performance where we have continually seen considerably worse throughput and latency numbers on Windows compared to Linux or macOS. We still have more testing and some known issues to stamp out, but we hope to get release 8.1.3 out, particularly for Windows users, in the near future.


Session

We’re finishing off the remaining Session Protocol changes this week. This primarily means changing closed groups to use the Session Protocol instead of our implementation of sender keys.

Session iOS 

Session Android 

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #133 appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Towards the end of 2020, we announced the biggest change to the Loki Project since launch: Loki is rebranding to become Oxen. There have been plenty of questions about what the rebrand entails, when everything will be happening, and what our users need to do (spoiler alert: Loki users and $LOKI holders don’t need to do anything whatsoever). To minimise uncertainty and confusion, today we’re announcing our roadmap and timeline for rolling out the Oxen rebrand.

For an overview of the reasons behind the rebrand, head over to our rebrand announcement blog

What’s happening today (6 Jan 2020, AEDT):

Today we’re dropping the first taste of Oxen’s gorgeous new branding: A landing page is now live at oxen.io. Head on over to feast your eyes on Oxen’s logo and a peek at the colour scheme we’ll be using.

What’s happening tomorrow (7 Jan 2020, AEDT):

Tomorrow is when the rollout really kicks off. Our social media accounts, Telegram community, and contact email will officially switch over to Oxen equivalents. An updated desktop wallet with Oxen branding will also be released tomorrow, and our exchange listings will start swapping from $LOKI to $OXEN (note: these are cosmetic changes only; $LOKI holders do not need to take any action). All Loki users can continue using their current wallets and services without having to update — everything will continue working as normal. But if you want to see the slick new branding in the wallet, you should update regardless!

What’s happening over the coming weeks:

Over the following weeks, our listings on other service providers like CoinMarketCap and CoinGecko will make the switch to $OXEN. We’ll also be releasing completely new mobile wallets, rewritten from the ground up to be faster, better, and, of course, with that beautiful new Oxen branding. The older mobile wallets will continue to function, but keep an eye on our social channels for links to the new mobile apps when they’re available — we know you’re going to love them.

We’re also hard at work on the full Oxen website, which will be live at oxen.io in early February, along with fully reworked and rebranded documentation for every part of the project and our tech stack. In the meantime, the existing loki.network website will remain live until the rollout is completed.

Regarding wLoki: The wLoki transition is going to be a little bit more involved. We’ll make an announcement with more information in the coming days. For now, everything will continue working as usual, under the wLoki (Wrapped Loki) name.

How you (yes, you!) can help

We’re incredibly excited to begin the rollout of the Oxen branding in earnest. But we know that a staggered rollout like this means that there may be some confusion, especially for newcomers to the Oxen (Loki) community. So we’re calling on you, our loyal community members, to help clear things up. If you run across someone who’s unsure what’s going on or why, don’t hesitate to jump in and explain — or just refer them to our blog. 

Looking ahead

With the Oxen rebrand rolling out, we’re more bullish than ever about the future of the project we’ve built together. The future is bright, and we can’t wait to make this journey with you, our community.

It’s time for the Year of the Ox. 

Let’s go.

The post Oxen rebrand rollout: Our roadmap appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Towards the end of 2020, we announced the biggest change to the Loki Project since launch: Loki is rebranding to become Oxen. There have been plenty of questions about what the rebrand entails, when everything will be happening, and what our users need to do (spoiler alert: Loki users and $LOKI holders don’t need to do anything whatsoever). To minimise uncertainty and confusion, today we’re announcing our roadmap and timeline for rolling out the Oxen rebrand.

For an overview of the reasons behind the rebrand, head over to our rebrand announcement blog

What’s happening today (6 Jan 2021, AEDT):

Today we’re dropping the first taste of Oxen’s gorgeous new branding: A landing page is now live at oxen.io. Head on over to feast your eyes on Oxen’s logo and a peek at the colour scheme we’ll be using.

What’s happening tomorrow (7 Jan 2021, AEDT):

Tomorrow is when the rollout really kicks off. Our social media accounts, Telegram community, and contact email will officially switch over to Oxen equivalents. An updated desktop wallet with Oxen branding will also be released tomorrow, and our exchange listings will start swapping from $LOKI to $OXEN (note: these are cosmetic changes only; $LOKI holders do not need to take any action). All Loki users can continue using their current wallets and services without having to update — everything will continue working as normal. But if you want to see the slick new branding in the wallet, you should update regardless!

What’s happening over the coming weeks:

Over the following weeks, our listings on other service providers like CoinMarketCap and CoinGecko will make the switch to $OXEN. We’ll also be releasing completely new mobile wallets, rewritten from the ground up to be faster, better, and, of course, with that beautiful new Oxen branding. The older mobile wallets will continue to function, but keep an eye on our social channels for links to the new mobile apps when they’re available — we know you’re going to love them.

We’re also hard at work on the full Oxen website, which will be live at oxen.io in early February, along with fully reworked and rebranded documentation for every part of the project and our tech stack. In the meantime, the existing loki.network website will remain live until the rollout is completed.

Regarding wLoki: The wLoki transition is going to be a little bit more involved. We’ll make an announcement with more information in the coming days. For now, everything will continue working as usual, under the wLoki (Wrapped Loki) name.

How you (yes, you!) can help

We’re incredibly excited to begin the rollout of the Oxen branding in earnest. But we know that a staggered rollout like this means that there may be some confusion, especially for newcomers to the Oxen (Loki) community. So we’re calling on you, our loyal community members, to help clear things up. If you run across someone who’s unsure what’s going on or why, don’t hesitate to jump in and explain — or just refer them to our blog. 

Looking ahead

With the Oxen rebrand rolling out, we’re more bullish than ever about the future of the project we’ve built together. The future is bright, and we can’t wait to make this journey with you, our community.

It’s time for the Year of the Ox. 

Let’s go.

The post Oxen rebrand rollout: Our roadmap appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Hey y’all, 

Today is the first day back for most of the Loki team after our Christmas break, so there’s a bit less in this dev update than usual. Rest assured, the Loki team is getting straight back onto the development train, working on essential Session features like reimplementing multi-device and building out Session Protocol support for closed groups. The Lokinet team is working on some Windows optimizations which should increase download speeds through exit nodes.

Loki Core 


Session

Before the holiday period, we rolled out the backwards-compatible version of the Session Protocol, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. We will be making various improvements over the next few weeks to further increase stability, particularly for closed groups. 

Session iOS 

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #132 appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Hey y’all, 

Today is the first day back for most of the Loki team after our Christmas break, so there’s a bit less in this dev update than usual. Rest assured, the Loki team is getting straight back onto the development train, working on essential Session features like reimplementing multi-device and building out Session Protocol support for closed groups. The Lokinet team is working on some Windows optimizations which should increase download speeds through exit nodes.

Loki Core 


Session

Before the holiday period, we rolled out the backwards-compatible version of the Session Protocol, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. We will be making various improvements over the next few weeks to further increase stability, particularly for closed groups. 

Session iOS 

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #132 appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #131

Hey Y’all, 

This week marks the start of the holiday season for most of the Loki team, so expect to see a little bit less content in the dev updates until the start of the new year. However, work is still ongoing, with a focus on Session and Loki Core. On the Session front, we released a new update on all platforms with new encryption protocol changes which you can read about here. On the Loki Core side, we finished Ledger support (which will be submitted to Ledger tomorrow), and we also worked on a number of quality of life fixes for wallet and service node users. 

Loki Core 


Session

Last week we released a significant update for all Session clients. This update moves Session to the Session Protocol, its own stateless encryption protocol, which should resolve many of the underlying issues we were having in conversation management. It should also allow us to more quickly develop features like multi-device and account restoration, without the solutions becoming overly complex.

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop

Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #131 appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #131

Hey Y’all, 

This week marks the start of the holiday season for most of the Loki team, so expect to see a little bit less content in the dev updates until the start of the new year. However, work is still ongoing, with a focus on Session and Loki Core. On the Session front, we released a new update on all platforms with new encryption protocol changes which you can read about here. On the Loki Core side, we finished Ledger support (which will be submitted to Ledger tomorrow), and we also worked on a number of quality of life fixes for wallet and service node users. 

Loki Core 


Session

Last week we released a significant update for all Session clients. This update moves Session to the Session Protocol, its own stateless encryption protocol, which should resolve many of the underlying issues we were having in conversation management. It should also allow us to more quickly develop features like multi-device and account restoration, without the solutions becoming overly complex.

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop

Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #131 appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #130

Hey Y’all, 

This week might seem a little scant for the dev update, but that’s because most of the work we have been doing is still contained to commits on remote or local branches. For example, the Session team is about to publish a refactor of the Session iOS sending and receiving pipeline, and work on the same refactor is progressing quickly on Android. Additionally, the Session desktop team is also about to publish the React refactored desktop application. The Loki Core team is finishing the final parts of Ledger integration, specifically focusing on staking and submitting LNS transactions from a Ledger device. 

Loki Core 


Lokinet

What went on last week with Lokinet: Little PR news to report this week as Lokinet’s lead developer (Jeff) has been taking a much-needed, long-overdue vacation. We have some preliminary Android work ongoing (no PR yet), and generally are pretty excited with how the 0.8.2 release is performing and being received. We’ve also been having some ongoing discussions about the feasibility of developing and distributing small “plug and play” Lokinet routers that would make Lokinet SNApp and exit support simple, even on devices where Lokinet isn’t available.

We’re spending some time this week on Lokinet rebranding: much as “Session” has its unique identity beyond the Loki blockchain, Lokinet’s rebrand aims to accomplish the same (no, it won’t be called “Oxennet”). If you have been holding onto a killer replacement name idea, now’s the time to send it in!


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #130 appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #130

Hey Y’all, 

This week might seem a little scant for the dev update, but that’s because most of the work we have been doing is still contained to commits on remote or local branches. For example, the Session team is about to publish a refactor of the Session iOS sending and receiving pipeline, and work on the same refactor is progressing quickly on Android. Additionally, the Session desktop team is also about to publish the React refactored desktop application. The Loki Core team is finishing the final parts of Ledger integration, specifically focusing on staking and submitting LNS transactions from a Ledger device. 

Loki Core 


Lokinet

What went on last week with Lokinet: Little PR news to report this week as Lokinet’s lead developer (Jeff) has been taking a much-needed, long-overdue vacation. We have some preliminary Android work ongoing (no PR yet), and generally are pretty excited with how the 0.8.2 release is performing and being received. We’ve also been having some ongoing discussions about the feasibility of developing and distributing small “plug and play” Lokinet routers that would make Lokinet SNApp and exit support simple, even on devices where Lokinet isn’t available.

We’re spending some time this week on Lokinet rebranding: much as “Session” has its unique identity beyond the Loki blockchain, Lokinet’s rebrand aims to accomplish the same (no, it won’t be called “Oxennet”). If you have been holding onto a killer replacement name idea, now’s the time to send it in!


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

The post Weekly Dev Update #130 appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Eth 2.0 is live. As of 12am UTC on Tuesday, 1 Dec, the first stage of Ethereum’s evolution into a Proof of Stake (PoS) blockchain has now begun. If PoS sounds familiar, that’s probably because Loki has been full PoS since the Salty Saga hardfork back in October.

But what is Proof of Stake, anyway? And why is it such a big deal?

Proof of Work, work, work, work, work, work…

All blockchains rely on something called a consensus mechanism to confirm transactions as valid and enter them into the blockchain. There are a handful of different consensus mechanisms in use, but the two most common types are Proof of Work and Proof of Stake. 

Until now, the primary version of the Ethereum blockchain has been based on a Proof of Work (PoW) consensus mechanism. PoW is most commonly known as mining. Fundamentally, “mining” crypto through PoW means competing with other miners to solve mathematical problems. The first worker to provide a valid solution attaches that solution — the literal proof of work — to a “block” of crypto transactions, marking those transactions as valid and adding them to the blockchain. That miner then receives the block reward (a certain amount of that blockchain’s crypto) for validating that block, and the process begins again.

But PoW has a few fundamental limitations that hold back PoW-based blockchains.

For one, PoW on most blockchains has a significant hardware barrier to entry. Back in the early days of Bitcoin, mining BTC was as easy as firing up a mining tool on your GPU and letting it run. These days, that’s still technically true — but now you’re competing with massive server farms full of ASICs (specialised processors designed purely to mine BTC), making it enormously difficult for normal users to participate in the ecosystem.

Another issue with PoW is power consumption. As we talked about here, PoW crypto mining is a huge power sink. In 2017, Bitcoin mining alone used over 30 terawatts of power globally — that’s more electricity than the entire country of Ireland consumes in a year. Not only does this cause local issues like electrical grid brownouts and blackouts, it’s also a serious environmental problem on a wider scale. 

Proof of Stake: Stakin’ for that bacon

So, PoW has some problems. But what’s the alternative? You guessed it — Proof of Stake, as featured in Loki’s very own Salty Saga hardfork 2 months ago, and now the core building block of Eth 2.0.

In a Proof of Stake blockchain, you can stake (lock up) a certain amount of crypto — the staking requirement — in order to run a node on that blockchain’s network. Once your node has been staked, it has a chance of being chosen to create blocks of transactions (and earning the corresponding block reward by doing so). PoS blockchains typically place staked nodes into an ordered queue, ensuring that nodes receive block rewards regularly (the exact time between rewards varies proportional to the number of nodes on the network).

Proof of Stake has some serious benefits compared to PoW. PoS ensures that anyone who can afford the staking requirement (and a few dollars per month for a VPS) can run a full node on the network with a reward rate (typically) significantly higher than rewards earned from investing the same amount into mining hardware.

At the same time, requiring node operators to own and stake an amount of crypto ensures that all node operators have skin in the game: every operator is also a holder of the blockchain’s token, incentivising them to work to increase the token’s value.

PoS can also provide a high level of resistance to Sybil attacks and 51% attacks. Such attacks involve one person or entity gaining control of the majority of computing power on a blockchain network, enabling the attacker to create an alternate history of transaction blocks which will be accepted by all blockchain nodes because that alternative chain has more PoW behind it than the real chain. A PoW-based blockchain will always theoretically be vulnerable to a Sybil attack, because anyone with access to sufficient computing power could reverse old transactions by reorganizing the blockchain. In a PoS blockchain, however, controlling the majority of nodes on the network requires controlling at least as much of the total crypto supply as is already staked into existing nodes. If a sufficiently large amount of that crypto is already staked into existing nodes, such an attack becomes near-impossible. 

Eth 2.0 and Proof of Stake: Looking forward

Loki and Eth are both going all-in on PoS (though Eth 2.0 won’t be fully operational until sometime in 2022). A huge project like Eth throwing its weight behind PoS is a massive vote of confidence, and yet another confirmation that Loki made the right call with our switch to PoS back in October.

So what does this mean for you? In a nutshell: better, more secure blockchains that are easier to participate in, and more environmentally friendly to boot. We’re excited to see more blockchain projects migrating to PoS, and we can’t wait to see where the future of PoS blockchains takes us.

The post High stakes: Eth 2.0, PoS, and the future of blockchain tech appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Eth 2.0 is live. As of 12am UTC on Tuesday, 1 Dec, the first stage of Ethereum’s evolution into a Proof of Stake (PoS) blockchain has now begun. If PoS sounds familiar, that’s probably because Loki has been full PoS since the Salty Saga hardfork back in October.

But what is Proof of Stake, anyway? And why is it such a big deal?

Proof of Work, work, work, work, work, work…

All blockchains rely on something called a consensus mechanism to confirm transactions as valid and enter them into the blockchain. There are a handful of different consensus mechanisms in use, but the two most common types are Proof of Work and Proof of Stake. 

Until now, the primary version of the Ethereum blockchain has been based on a Proof of Work (PoW) consensus mechanism. PoW is most commonly known as mining. Fundamentally, “mining” crypto through PoW means competing with other miners to solve mathematical problems. The first worker to provide a valid solution attaches that solution — the literal proof of work — to a “block” of crypto transactions, marking those transactions as valid and adding them to the blockchain. That miner then receives the block reward (a certain amount of that blockchain’s crypto) for validating that block, and the process begins again.

But PoW has a few fundamental limitations that hold back PoW-based blockchains.

For one, PoW on most blockchains has a significant hardware barrier to entry. Back in the early days of Bitcoin, mining BTC was as easy as firing up a mining tool on your GPU and letting it run. These days, that’s still technically true — but now you’re competing with massive server farms full of ASICs (specialised processors designed purely to mine BTC), making it enormously difficult for normal users to participate in the ecosystem.

Another issue with PoW is power consumption. As we talked about here, PoW crypto mining is a huge power sink. In 2017, Bitcoin mining alone used over 30 terawatts of power globally — that’s more electricity than the entire country of Ireland consumes in a year. Not only does this cause local issues like electrical grid brownouts and blackouts, it’s also a serious environmental problem on a wider scale. 

Proof of Stake: Stakin’ for that bacon

So, PoW has some problems. But what’s the alternative? You guessed it — Proof of Stake, as featured in Loki’s very own Salty Saga hardfork 2 months ago, and now the core building block of Eth 2.0.

In a Proof of Stake blockchain, you can stake (lock up) a certain amount of crypto — the staking requirement — in order to run a node on that blockchain’s network. Once your node has been staked, it has a chance of being chosen to create blocks of transactions (and earning the corresponding block reward by doing so). PoS blockchains typically place staked nodes into an ordered queue, ensuring that nodes receive block rewards regularly (the exact time between rewards varies proportional to the number of nodes on the network).

Proof of Stake has some serious benefits compared to PoW. PoS ensures that anyone who can afford the staking requirement (and a few dollars per month for a VPS) can run a full node on the network with a reward rate (typically) significantly higher than rewards earned from investing the same amount into mining hardware.

At the same time, requiring node operators to own and stake an amount of crypto ensures that all node operators have skin in the game: every operator is also a holder of the blockchain’s token, incentivising them to work to increase the token’s value.

PoS can also provide a high level of resistance to Sybil attacks and 51% attacks. Such attacks involve one person or entity gaining control of the majority of computing power on a blockchain network, enabling the attacker to create an alternate history of transaction blocks which will be accepted by all blockchain nodes because that alternative chain has more PoW behind it than the real chain. A PoW-based blockchain will always theoretically be vulnerable to a Sybil attack, because anyone with access to sufficient computing power could reverse old transactions by reorganizing the blockchain. In a PoS blockchain, however, controlling the majority of nodes on the network requires controlling at least as much of the total crypto supply as is already staked into existing nodes. If a sufficiently large amount of that crypto is already staked into existing nodes, such an attack becomes near-impossible. 

Eth 2.0 and Proof of Stake: Looking forward

Loki and Eth are both going all-in on PoS (though Eth 2.0 won’t be fully operational until sometime in 2022). A huge project like Eth throwing its weight behind PoS is a massive vote of confidence, and yet another confirmation that Loki made the right call with our switch to PoS back in October.

So what does this mean for you? In a nutshell: better, more secure blockchains that are easier to participate in, and more environmentally friendly to boot. We’re excited to see more blockchain projects migrating to PoS, and we can’t wait to see where the future of PoS blockchains takes us.

The post High stakes: Eth 2.0, PoS, and the future of blockchain tech appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #129

Hey Y’all, 

This week we worked on fixing up various bugs found in the Lokinet GUI. The Session team continued working on the client refactor and also published a new desktop release which fixed a few bugs. The Loki Core team continued their efforts to integrate Loki into Ledger devices, making the new code compatible with CLSAG transactions.

Loki Core 

Loki Electron Wallet


Lokinet

You can catch Jeff, the lead developer of LLARP, live streaming as he codes at https://www.twitch.tv/uguu25519. He typically streams on Tuesday mornings, 9am – 12pm Eastern (US) time.

What went on last week with Lokinet: We shipped Lokinet 0.8.2 on all platforms last week; this fixed a few issues on Linux/Windows, and was our first public 0.8 series release for macOS.  Since then we’ve had a few bug reports (keep them coming!) and have been addressing some of the issues.

Lokinet PR Activity:


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Loki Storage Server 

Thanks,  

Kee

The post Weekly Dev Update #129 appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

Weekly Dev Update #129

Hey Y’all, 

This week we worked on fixing up various bugs found in the Lokinet GUI. The Session team continued working on the client refactor and also published a new desktop release which fixed a few bugs. The Loki Core team continued their efforts to integrate Loki into Ledger devices, making the new code compatible with CLSAG transactions.

Loki Core 

Loki Electron Wallet


Lokinet

You can catch Jeff, the lead developer of LLARP, live streaming as he codes at https://www.twitch.tv/uguu25519. He typically streams on Tuesday mornings, 9am – 12pm Eastern (US) time.

What went on last week with Lokinet: We shipped Lokinet 0.8.2 on all platforms last week; this fixed a few issues on Linux/Windows, and was our first public 0.8 series release for macOS.  Since then we’ve had a few bug reports (keep them coming!) and have been addressing some of the issues.

Lokinet PR Activity:


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Loki Storage Server 

Thanks,  

Kee

The post Weekly Dev Update #129 appeared first on Loki.

View the full article

Snider

We’ve talked a lot about the benefits of Proof of Stake for the Loki blockchain, but there’s another huge upside to PoS compared to our old hybrid PoS-PoW consensus mechanism: it’s a lot kinder to the planet.

grinch-1.png

Proof of… Harm?

Proof of Work — the system many people know as “crypto mining” — has some very real benefits when it comes to securing blockchains. But it has some nasty downsides, too, and one of the worst is power consumption. To dive into exactly why that is, we need to take a brief look at what Proof of Work actually entails.

Fundamentally, “mining” crypto through Proof of Work means competing with other miners to solve mathematical problems. The first worker to solve a problem attaches the solution — the literal proof of work — to a “block” of crypto transactions, marking those transactions as valid and adding them to the blockchain. Seems simple enough, right? 

Well, yes and no.

The average user’s desktop PC draws anywhere between 300 and 500 watts of power when it’s being pushed to its limit. A dedicated crypto mining rig, with an array of high-powered graphics cards or dedicated ASICs, can draw several thousand watts — and those rigs are often left on 24/7, maximising the chance of solving blocks to get that sweet, sweet block reward.

When you consider that there are millions of people mining different crypos all over the world, all that power usage adds up.

It was estimated that in 2017, Bitcoin mining alone used over 30 terawatts of power globally — that’s more electricity than the entire country of Ireland consumes in a year. When you factor in all the other Proof of Work cryptocurrencies, and the fact that the number of miners is only going up, crypto mining is consuming a truly insane amount of electricity. And when the vast majority of electricity worldwide is still drawn from non-renewable sources like coal and gas, crypto mining starts to look like a serious environmental crisis in the making.

Go green or go home

So what can we do? Simple — ditch PoW. Proof of Stake and other alternative consensus mechanisms don’t rely on competitive problem-solving in the same way Proof of Work does, making them exponentially more power-efficient and significantly reducing their impact on the environment.

And when Proof of Stake has so many other benefits for the blockchain ecosystem too, it’s even more of a no-brainer.

With Salty Saga and Pulse, Loki isn’t just setting up our ecosystem for the next decade of crypto — we’re doing what we can to help the planet by massively reducing the Loki blockchain’s carbon footprint.

The post Pulse for the planet: How Salty Saga makes Loki greener than ever appeared first on Loki.


View the full article

Snider

We’ve talked a lot about the benefits of Proof of Stake for the Loki blockchain, but there’s another huge upside to PoS compared to our old hybrid PoS-PoW consensus mechanism: it’s a lot kinder to the planet.

grinch-1.png

Proof of… Harm?

Proof of Work — the system many people know as “crypto mining” — has some very real benefits when it comes to securing blockchains. But it has some nasty downsides, too, and one of the worst is power consumption. To dive into exactly why that is, we need to take a brief look at what Proof of Work actually entails.

Fundamentally, “mining” crypto through Proof of Work means competing with other miners to solve mathematical problems. The first worker to solve a problem attaches the solution — the literal proof of work — to a “block” of crypto transactions, marking those transactions as valid and adding them to the blockchain. Seems simple enough, right? 

Well, yes and no.

The average user’s desktop PC draws anywhere between 300 and 500 watts of power when it’s being pushed to its limit. A dedicated crypto mining rig, with an array of high-powered graphics cards or dedicated ASICs, can draw several thousand watts — and those rigs are often left on 24/7, maximising the chance of solving blocks to get that sweet, sweet block reward.

When you consider that there are millions of people mining different crypos all over the world, all that power usage adds up.

It was estimated that in 2017, Bitcoin mining alone used over 30 terawatts of power globally — that’s more electricity than the entire country of Ireland consumes in a year. When you factor in all the other Proof of Work cryptocurrencies, and the fact that the number of miners is only going up, crypto mining is consuming a truly insane amount of electricity. And when the vast majority of electricity worldwide is still drawn from non-renewable sources like coal and gas, crypto mining starts to look like a serious environmental crisis in the making.

Go green or go home

So what can we do? Simple — ditch PoW. Proof of Stake and other alternative consensus mechanisms don’t rely on competitive problem-solving in the same way Proof of Work does, making them exponentially more power-efficient and significantly reducing their impact on the environment.

And when Proof of Stake has so many other benefits for the blockchain ecosystem too, it’s even more of a no-brainer.

With Salty Saga and Pulse, Loki isn’t just setting up our ecosystem for the next decade of crypto — we’re doing what we can to help the planet by massively reducing the Loki blockchain’s carbon footprint.

The post Pulse for the planet: How Salty Saga makes Loki greener than ever appeared first on Loki.

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Mumble is a  fantastic open-source voice chat platform known for its reliability and ease of use.

And Lokinet is a cutting-edge onion routing network that offers unparalleled security and anonymity potential.

Well what if you could run a Mumble server over Lokinet, combining Mumble’s ease of use with Lokinet’s security and anonymity to create the ultimate secure voice chat service? In this article, we’re going to cover how to do exactly that — with just 15 minutes of your time and $3 a month, you and your organisation can create one of the most secure voice chat platforms possible. 

A Mumble server running over Lokinet on a server you control gives you absolute certainty that your voice conversations, associated metadata, and other Mumble activity cannot be stored or recorded, because no computer ever knows who is talking to whom — not even the Mumble server itself. So long as you trust the device that you run the Mumble server on (which you can, because it’s yours), you can be certain that no one else on earth can eavesdrop on your conversation — or even know that you’re connected to the server at all.

If this is your first time using SSH and Linux stuff, don’t stress. We’ll walk you through every step! With that, let’s get to it. 

Step 1: Rent a VPS

The first thing you’ll want to do is rent yourself a VPS (Virtual Private Server) to host your Mumble voice chat server. You could run the Mumble server from your own computer instead, but if you want the server to stay up 24/7, without having to leave your own PC on all the time, a VPS is the way to go. Mumble’s chat server has extremely low system requirements, so a VPS with any amount of storage and at least 512MB RAM will do the trick — you can find VPSs that meet these requirements for around US$3 a month. 

Try https://www.hetzner.com/cloud, or https://evolution-host.com/vps-hosting.php if you want to pay in Loki/Oxen! When ordering, select Ubuntu 20.04 or Debian 10.

Step 2: Prepare your VPS

Once you have access to your new VPS, you’re almost ready to install Lokinet, but there’s a little bit of preparatory work to do first. Start by opening a command prompt on your local machine (Terminal on macOS, any command prompt on Linux, or PowerShell on Windows 10). SSH into your VPS with this command:

ssh root@[VPS IP address]

Replacing [VPS IP address] with the IP of your VPS.  It’ll prompt you for a password which will usually be provided to you by the VPS host. More advanced users can and should disable root password access and instead use SSH keys, but if that sounds hard, don’t worry about it for now. As you learn more about Linux, you’ll get more familiar with these best practices.

Once you’ve logged in, we’re ready to roll. First, we’ll update our package lists to make sure our VPS sees the most recent versions of all available packages. Type:

sudo apt update

You’ll see a bunch of package lists being downloaded. Once this command completes, run the following command to upgrade any outdated packages currently installed on the VPS:

sudo apt upgrade

We’ll also need to make sure the curl command is installed before we proceed. Run this command:

which curl

It should output the location of your installed curl command. If you get an error, install curl:

sudo apt install curl

Then run which curl again to make sure curl is installed. 

Success? Congrats, you’re ready to move on to the next step:  

Step 3: Install Lokinet

To install Lokinet, we need to add the Lokinet repository. Run the following command to install the public key used by the Lokinet dev team to sign Lokinet binaries:

curl -s https://deb.imaginary.stream/public.gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Then run the following command to tell apt where to find the Lokinet packages:

echo "deb https://deb.imaginary.stream $(lsb_release -sc) main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/imaginary.stream.list

Next, update your repository package lists again with:

sudo apt update

And now, install Lokinet:

sudo apt install lokinet

Congrats, Lokinet is now installed and running in the background. We’re nearly there.

Step 4: Installing the Mumble server

Run this command:

sudo apt install mumble-server

That’s it. The Mumble server is now installed. On to Step 5:

Step 5: Setting up a persistent keyfile

This step is a bit more involved. We need to set up Lokinet to always generate a keyfile in the same directory, so it will work consistently. Linux servers don’t have a graphical interface, but they do ship with some in-terminal text editors. We need to edit a file now, so start by opening your lokinet.ini file with this command:

sudo nano /etc/loki/lokinet.ini

Using the arrow keys, move the cursor down to the [network] section of the file. Remove the # from before the “keyfile=” line, then add the following after the = symbol:

/var/lib/lokinet/mumble.private

Then hit Ctrl+X. Type “Y” (for yes) when asked if you want to save your changes, then press Enter to save and exit.

Now that you’ve exited nano, you’re back in the terminal. Restart Lokinet to generate a keyfile for Mumble:

sudo systemctl restart lokinet

Step 6: Binding the Mumble server to Lokinet

Now we need to make sure your Mumble server is using Lokinet for all traffic. Start with this command to grab the IP address we need to bind Mumble to:

dig @127.3.2.1 +short localhost.loki

This command will output 2 strings of text: a long string of random letters and numbers ending in .loki, and an IP address (a number in the format xxx.xx(x).x.x). 

Select and copy (Ctrl+C on Windows or Linux; Cmd+C on macOS) the IP address. Some SSH clients allow you to copy by highlighting the text and right-clicking on it as well.

Now, we need to point the Mumble server to that IP address. Use this command to open the configuration file for the Mumble server:

nano /etc/mumble-server.ini 

Using the arrow keys, navigate down to the line “;host=” under the section Specific IP or hostname to bind to. Delete the ; from the start of the line, then paste the IP address we copied earlier after the = symbol. Hit Ctrl+X to exit. Type “Y” when asked if you want to save your changes, then press Enter to save and exit.

Back at the command line, restart the Mumble server to apply changes:

systemctl restart mumble-server

Step 7: Done!

Congrats! A Mumble server is now up and running on your VPS, and all its traffic is being routed through Lokinet. All that’s left is to grab the Lokinet address of the Mumble server and give it to anyone you want to be able to connect. In case you missed it, run this command to find the Lokinet address of the Mumble server:

dig @127.3.2.1 +short localhost.loki

This is the same command we ran earlier, but this time, pay attention to the long string of characters ending in .loki (be sure to include the .loki part). This is the Lokinet address of your secure, onion-routed Mumble server. 

Copy this address and provide it to anyone you want to be able to connect to the server — all they have to do is paste the address into the Address field of the Add Server dialog in the Mumble client, add a username and label to identify the server, hit OK, and connect!

Mumble can be downloaded for free on all major platforms. Anyone that wants to access your secret Mumble server will also need to have Lokinet installed and running. To download and install Lokinet, just head to https://lokinet.org/. Further Lokinet guides can be found at https://docs.loki.network/Lokinet/LokinetOverview/.

And that’s it! Only 15 minutes and $3 later, you can now have completely surveillance-free conversations over the internet. We hope to integrate voice features into Session to make it even easier to access secure voice channels with this level of privacy and security. 

In the meantime, though, this Mumble/Lokinet setup is perhaps the most secure voice channel option available. This unique combination of services is just one example of the power of the Oxen tech stack — stay tuned for more guides and articles about what Oxen’s tech can do. 

Have fun!

The post 15 minutes and just $3 a month: Putting the most secure voice service at your fingertips appeared first on Loki.


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Snider

Mumble is a  fantastic open-source voice chat platform known for its reliability and ease of use.

And Lokinet is a cutting-edge onion routing network that offers unparalleled security and anonymity potential.

Well what if you could run a Mumble server over Lokinet, combining Mumble’s ease of use with Lokinet’s security and anonymity to create the ultimate secure voice chat service? In this article, we’re going to cover how to do exactly that — with just 15 minutes of your time and $3 a month, you and your organisation can create one of the most secure voice chat platforms possible. 

A Mumble server running over Lokinet on a server you control gives you absolute certainty that your voice conversations, associated metadata, and other Mumble activity cannot be stored or recorded, because no computer ever knows who is talking to whom — not even the Mumble server itself. So long as you trust the device that you run the Mumble server on (which you can, because it’s yours), you can be certain that no one else on earth can eavesdrop on your conversation — or even know that you’re connected to the server at all.

If this is your first time using SSH and Linux stuff, don’t stress. We’ll walk you through every step! With that, let’s get to it. 

Step 1: Rent a VPS

The first thing you’ll want to do is rent yourself a VPS (Virtual Private Server) to host your Mumble voice chat server. You could run the Mumble server from your own computer instead, but if you want the server to stay up 24/7, without having to leave your own PC on all the time, a VPS is the way to go. Mumble’s chat server has extremely low system requirements, so a VPS with any amount of storage and at least 512MB RAM will do the trick — you can find VPSs that meet these requirements for around US$3 a month. 

Try https://www.hetzner.com/cloud, or https://evolution-host.com/vps-hosting.php if you want to pay in Loki/Oxen! When ordering, select Ubuntu 20.04 or Debian 10.

Step 2: Prepare your VPS

Once you have access to your new VPS, you’re almost ready to install Lokinet, but there’s a little bit of preparatory work to do first. Start by opening a command prompt on your local machine (Terminal on macOS, any command prompt on Linux, or PowerShell on Windows 10). SSH into your VPS with this command:

ssh root@[VPS IP address]

Replacing [VPS IP address] with the IP of your VPS.  It’ll prompt you for a password which will usually be provided to you by the VPS host. More advanced users can and should disable root password access and instead use SSH keys, but if that sounds hard, don’t worry about it for now. As you learn more about Linux, you’ll get more familiar with these best practices.

Once you’ve logged in, we’re ready to roll. First, we’ll update our package lists to make sure our VPS sees the most recent versions of all available packages. Type:

sudo apt update

You’ll see a bunch of package lists being downloaded. Once this command completes, run the following command to upgrade any outdated packages currently installed on the VPS:

sudo apt upgrade

We’ll also need to make sure the curl command is installed before we proceed. Run this command:

which curl

It should output the location of your installed curl command. If you get an error, install curl:

sudo apt install curl

Then run which curl again to make sure curl is installed. 

Success? Congrats, you’re ready to move on to the next step:  

Step 3: Install Lokinet

To install Lokinet, we need to add the Lokinet repository. Run the following command to install the public key used by the Lokinet dev team to sign Lokinet binaries:

curl -s https://deb.imaginary.stream/public.gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Then run the following command to tell apt where to find the Lokinet packages:

echo "deb https://deb.imaginary.stream $(lsb_release -sc) main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/imaginary.stream.list

Next, update your repository package lists again with:

sudo apt update

And now, install Lokinet:

sudo apt install lokinet

Congrats, Lokinet is now installed and running in the background. We’re nearly there.

Step 4: Installing the Mumble server

Run this command:

sudo apt install mumble-server

That’s it. The Mumble server is now installed. On to Step 5:

Step 5: Setting up a persistent keyfile

This step is a bit more involved. We need to set up Lokinet to always generate a keyfile in the same directory, so it will work consistently. Linux servers don’t have a graphical interface, but they do ship with some in-terminal text editors. We need to edit a file now, so start by opening your lokinet.ini file with this command:

sudo nano /etc/loki/lokinet.ini

Using the arrow keys, move the cursor down to the [network] section of the file. Remove the # from before the “keyfile=” line, then add the following after the = symbol:

/var/lib/lokinet/mumble.private

Then hit Ctrl+X. Type “Y” (for yes) when asked if you want to save your changes, then press Enter to save and exit.

Now that you’ve exited nano, you’re back in the terminal. Restart Lokinet to generate a keyfile for Mumble:

sudo systemctl restart lokinet

Step 6: Binding the Mumble server to Lokinet

Now we need to make sure your Mumble server is using Lokinet for all traffic. Start with this command to grab the IP address we need to bind Mumble to:

dig @127.3.2.1 +short localhost.loki

This command will output 2 strings of text: a long string of random letters and numbers ending in .loki, and an IP address (a number in the format xxx.xx(x).x.x). 

Select and copy (Ctrl+C on Windows or Linux; Cmd+C on macOS) the IP address. Some SSH clients allow you to copy by highlighting the text and right-clicking on it as well.

Now, we need to point the Mumble server to that IP address. Use this command to open the configuration file for the Mumble server:

nano /etc/mumble-server.ini 

Using the arrow keys, navigate down to the line “;host=” under the section Specific IP or hostname to bind to. Delete the ; from the start of the line, then paste the IP address we copied earlier after the = symbol. Hit Ctrl+X to exit. Type “Y” when asked if you want to save your changes, then press Enter to save and exit.

Back at the command line, restart the Mumble server to apply changes:

systemctl restart mumble-server

Step 7: Done!

Congrats! A Mumble server is now up and running on your VPS, and all its traffic is being routed through Lokinet. All that’s left is to grab the Lokinet address of the Mumble server and give it to anyone you want to be able to connect. In case you missed it, run this command to find the Lokinet address of the Mumble server:

dig @127.3.2.1 +short localhost.loki

This is the same command we ran earlier, but this time, pay attention to the long string of characters ending in .loki (be sure to include the .loki part). This is the Lokinet address of your secure, onion-routed Mumble server. 

Copy this address and provide it to anyone you want to be able to connect to the server — all they have to do is paste the address into the Address field of the Add Server dialog in the Mumble client, add a username and label to identify the server, hit OK, and connect!

Mumble can be downloaded for free on all major platforms. Anyone that wants to access your secret Mumble server will also need to have Lokinet installed and running. To download and install Lokinet, just head to https://lokinet.org/. Further Lokinet guides can be found at https://docs.loki.network/Lokinet/LokinetOverview/.

And that’s it! Only 15 minutes and $3 later, you can now have completely surveillance-free conversations over the internet. We hope to integrate voice features into Session to make it even easier to access secure voice channels with this level of privacy and security. 

In the meantime, though, this Mumble/Lokinet setup is perhaps the most secure voice channel option available. This unique combination of services is just one example of the power of the Oxen tech stack — stay tuned for more guides and articles about what Oxen’s tech can do. 

Have fun!

The post 15 minutes and just $3 a month: Putting the most secure voice service at your fingertips appeared first on Loki.

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Weekly Dev Update #128

Hey Y’all, 

This week the Lokinet team continued working on fixes for the Mac release, which had some unresolved issues in the installer/uninstaller. The Loki Core team worked on the 8.1.4 release, which fixes a few issues exchanges were encountering and adds some new features to the wallet which are likely to be used in the Chainflip Service Node airdrop. Capping things off, the Session team began a large refactorisation effort which we will be talking about publicly in the coming weeks. 

Loki Core 


Lokinet

You can catch Jeff, the lead developer of LLARP, live streaming as he codes at https://www.twitch.tv/uguu25519. He typically streams on Tuesday mornings, 9am – 12pm Eastern (US) time.

What went on last week with Lokinet: Various PRs to fix various minor Linux, Windows, and macOS bugs found since last week’s 0.8.1 release.  We’re nearly ready for an updated release for Linux/Windows (and initial 0.8 series release for Mac) with just a couple small issues left before the release.

Lokinet PR Activity:


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

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Weekly Dev Update #128

Hey Y’all, 

This week the Lokinet team continued working on fixes for the Mac release, which had some unresolved issues in the installer/uninstaller. The Loki Core team worked on the 8.1.4 release, which fixes a few issues exchanges were encountering and adds some new features to the wallet which are likely to be used in the Chainflip Service Node airdrop. Capping things off, the Session team began a large refactorisation effort which we will be talking about publicly in the coming weeks. 

Loki Core 


Lokinet

You can catch Jeff, the lead developer of LLARP, live streaming as he codes at https://www.twitch.tv/uguu25519. He typically streams on Tuesday mornings, 9am – 12pm Eastern (US) time.

What went on last week with Lokinet: Various PRs to fix various minor Linux, Windows, and macOS bugs found since last week’s 0.8.1 release.  We’re nearly ready for an updated release for Linux/Windows (and initial 0.8 series release for Mac) with just a couple small issues left before the release.

Lokinet PR Activity:


Session

Session iOS 

Session Android

Session Desktop


Thanks,  

Kee 

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Lokinet exit nodes have been on the bucket list for Lokinet since launch — and this week, exits have entered the building.

That’s right, this is not a drill, Lokinet exit node functionality is making its way to a Lokinet client near you. If you’ve been following Lokinet for a while, you’ll know just how big of a deal this is. But if you’re new to the Lokinet landscape, or just want to brush up on the basics of onion routing, you’ve come to the right place.

Lokinet exit nodes: How they work, what they do, and what they mean for you

In a nutshell, Lokinet exit nodes allow you to onion-route all your internet traffic over Lokinet. Every site you browse, every meme you share, every video you stream — all that traffic is completely anonymised by Lokinet’s onion routing. With exit nodes, Lokinet functions similarly to a VPN — but better. Let’s break down how all that works.

When you enable exit node browsing and connect to an exit node through the Lokinet client, your traffic is encrypted multiple times, once for every node it will travel through, then sent to a Lokinet “edge node” — your entry point to the Lokinet network. That node forwards your traffic through the network until it reaches a “pivot node”, which knows the location of the exit node you’re connecting to. That pivot node then relays your traffic — still fully encrypted — to the exit node. The exit node then decrypts your traffic and forwards it to its destination. The process for incoming traffic is the same in reverse.

Diagram-1-01-1024x193.pngA typical Lokinet exit node path

But hold on a minute. The exit node decrypts your traffic? How anonymous can this be if the exit node knows what you’re sending and receiving?

The answer is simple: the exit node may know what traffic is passing through it, but  it never knows who is sending or receiving that traffic. If you connect to a Lokinet exit node to send dankmeme.gif to someone on Facebook, the exit node may know that you’re sending something to someone on Facebook — but it won’t know who is sending it. And if the traffic is secured using HTTPS, the node won’t know exactly what you’re sending, either. Your ISP will know that you’re connected to Lokinet, but they won’t know whether you’re even connected to an exit node. And because Lokinet is fully decentralised, unlike VPN providers, there’s no central authority that can log your IP address, even if they wanted to.

When you’re browsing through a Lokinet exit node, no other server, anywhere on the internet, ever gets the complete picture about what you’re accessing. The first Lokinet node you connect to will know your IP address, but because your traffic is already fully encrypted, that node won’t know what you’re sending or receiving — all they know is that you’re using Lokinet in some way. The nodes in between that node and the exit node know absolutely nothing — they can’t see your IP or the contents or destination of the traffic they’re relaying; all they see are unreadable packets of data that they need to pass along the chain. And the exit node decrypts your traffic, but that node has no clue who sent it. Full anonymity, powered by Lokinet.

Lokinet exit node release: What works, what doesn’t, and what we want to know

In a nutshell, everything should “just work”. You should be able to enter an exit node’s details in the Lokinet client, enable it, and voila — you should be browsing the clearnet through Lokinet. You can check whether it’s working by using a site like WhatsMyIP: load it up before connecting to an exit node, check your IP, connect to an exit node and check your IP again. You should see your IP change once you’re browsing via Lokinet.

Wondering where to find those exit node details? There’s currently one exit node available, accessed via this address: exit.loki

However, there are a few provisos. There may be some service disruptions during this initial period, as until more nodes become available, everyone will be using the same exit node — the node may experience performance bottlenecks with all that traffic running through it. And if you’re hoping to use Lokinet exits to stream Netflix, you may run into issues. Netflix blocks most known VPS providers, so depending on where the exit node you’re using is hosted, you might not be able to anonymously catch up on Stranger Things.

We’ll be keeping our ears to the ground for any and all bug reports and other issues you might encounter. If you run into any issues with the GUI, problems connecting to or using exit nodes, or anomalous CPU or memory usage, let us know and we’ll look into it. We’d also love to see some SpeedTest results with exit nodes enabled — it should be pretty smooth, but the proof is in the pudding. And if you have any other feedback, questions, or suggestions, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Happy anonymous browsing!

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When the Salty Saga hardfork landed, we made the decision to set aside 6 LOKI per block for the first six months following the hardfork as a fund to incentivise liquidity for Chainflip and wLOKI. With the recent announcement that Chainflip will be forming its own blockchain, this is no longer necessary, because Chainflip can provide its own incentives. 

With that in mind, the Loki Foundation has resolved to burn this liquidity provision.

This will be the largest public burn in Loki’s history. While that is the most important part of this announcement, in the interests of transparency, we will outline more information about the burn in this article. 

How the liquidity provision worked

The liquidity provision was to be paid out at 6 LOKI per block, starting at height 641,111. However, this is actually only paid once a week, at heights divisible by 5,040. This means that the first reward was actually received at block height 645,120, then 650,160, and so on, with the final reward scheduled to be received at block height 766,080. 

Each reward is 42,840 LOKI — with 30,240 of that being the provision, and 12,600 being the governance reward. Twenty-five rewards are set to be received over the 6-month-life of the provision, totalling 756,000 Loki. 

As things stand, the liquidity provision will automatically terminate at block height 770,711, and it would require a hardfork in order to remove the 6 LOKI per block reward any earlier. Although there may be a hardfork before this, we’re not planning to complete a mandatory upgrade solely to amend the block reward before block height 770,711. 

Mandatory upgrades require a lot of coordination and administration on the part of the Loki Foundation, the Loki team, and the Service Node operators who run the network. To keep things as simple and transparent as possible, all of the unused rewards received as a part of this provision will be publicly burnt. Burning is already enabled by the Loki blockchain, and is regularly used for Blink transaction fees as well as Loki Name Service Registrations. This means we can complete the burn using a modified wallet without making any changes to the blockchain itself.

How much of the liquidity provision was used

Because Chainflip has only been in internal testing thus far, the liquidity fund has only been used to incentivise wLOKI liquidity on Uniswap. 

The first two rewards (totalling 60,480 LOKI) were used as a part of the wLOKI incentive scheme, which successfully bootstrapped liquidity on Uniswap.

This leaves 695,520 LOKI which will be burned.

For now, there are no immediate plans to run future incentive schemes for wLOKI on Uniswap, but the experience garnered from creating wLOKI, forming the Uniswap pair, and building the wLOKI bridge has already been of immense value to the project.

Come and talk to us

The decision to burn the Loki which was set aside for Chainflip liquidity makes the most sense for the project — and is hugely positive news for the Loki community, given that a large amount of LOKI is now scheduled to be publicly burnt. 

While burning is the simplest solution for this specific provision, we’re still interested in setting aside parts of the reward in the future for either liquidity or other community projects. However, this reward was approved by the community and the Foundation specifically to provide liquidity incentives for Chainflip, and it wouldn’t be appropriate for us to redirect these funds for anything else. In the interest of including the community in all major decisions regarding the project, we will re-consult with you about any new rewards, liquidity provisions, or funding for other projects.

There will also be an upcoming LRC to discuss the overall emission scheme of the project. Keep an eye out for an announcement about that — as per usual, we invite everyone in the community to come and offer their thoughts and opinions.
With that in mind, if you do want to talk to us about the burn — don’t hesitate to reach out to us via our Telegram community, Twitter, emailing team@loki.network, or any of our other social channels.

The post Let it burn: What we’re doing with the Loki Liquidity Provision appeared first on Loki.


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Weekly Dev Update #127

Hey Y’all, 

This week we released exit node support for Lokinet, with a new Windows and Linux GUI client. On the Session side of things, the team continued its work re-factoring the sending and receiving pipelines on iOS. Meanwhile, the Loki core team focused on some required patches for the 8.1.3 release, as well as some new features such as signing ASCII strings using your wallet keys. 

Loki Core 


Lokinet

You can catch Jeff, the lead developer of LLARP, live streaming as he codes at https://www.twitch.tv/uguu25519. He typically streams on Tuesday mornings, 9am – 12pm Eastern (US) time.

What went on last week with Lokinet: We got the Lokinet 0.8.1 release for general use out the door last week for Windows and Linux users. On macOS we ran into some last minute issues which warranted holding back for some fixes — which we should have ready to go this week (along with a few other small fixes for Windows and Linux for minor issues that have been reported in the past few days). This means Lokinet users can start accessing sites via LNS names, and can start experimenting with exit node support! We’d love to get your feedback on what works and what doesn’t so don’t be afraid to file bug reports or come talk to us directly.

Lokinet PR Activity:


Session

Session iOS

Message sending and receiving pipeline refactorisation https://github.com/loki-project/session-ios/pull/313, https://github.com/loki-project/session-ios/pull/311, https://github.com/loki-project/session-ios/pull/308 

Use LSRPC /v3 & fix open group profile picture bug https://github.com/loki-project/session-ios/pull/310 

Fix sender keys issues https://github.com/loki-project/session-ios/pull/312

Session Android

Session Desktop

Thanks,  

Kee

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You might not have heard about it yet — but Lokinet just got a massive update. The release of Lokinet proof of soon (yes, that’s what it’s called) brings two major upgrades to Lokinet’s usability and functionality: exit node functionality and LNS integration. 

Where we’re going, we need exit nodes

What’s an exit node, you ask? Well, when you used older versions of Lokinet, you were only surfing Lokinet, not the internet. The things that make Lokinet what it is — onion encryption and Service Nodes — didn’t play nice with the regular ol’ world wide web. While everything functioned properly when you’re accessing SNApps inside the walled garden of Lokinet, venturing to the wider plains of the internet was going to take a little bit of extra work. 

To roam the wide open plains of the internet at large with all the anonymity protections of Lokinet, we needed something called exit nodes

qvxcgcANYU05DXSRJzO0b5kmvM-QxsOXK9_f822A

Exit nodes are the gateways between Lokinet and the clearnet — websites on the ‘normal’ internet. Facebook. YouTube. Google. Amazon. With exit nodes, all of them can be accessed through Lokinet. 

Want to watch a video without being haunted by related ads for the next two weeks? 

Want to access content that isn’t available in your country :(? 

Well, now you can. 

The release of exit node functionality opens up a whole new world of possibilities for Lokinet. As you might already know, Lokinet is unlike any other onion router. It operates on the protocol layer, so it’s the first onion router with exit functionality that can actually deliver speeds that won’t give you dial-up flashbacks — and it works with practically any application out of the box. With exit node functionality, Lokinet can effectively be used as though it’s a supercharged VPN — to protect and anonymise your day-to-day internet usage.

Getting it set up is incredibly simple. All you have to do is open the Lokinet GUI and type in the address of the exit node you would like to use. For now, there is only one — exit.loki — and it doesn’t require an authentication code. Once you’ve input the address of the exit node and started Lokinet, you can start browsing the internet in sweet, sweet privacy. 

Say my name, say my name

Although exit node functionality is the biggest upgrade to Lokinet yet — this next feature might be a close second. We have now released full LNS integration for Lokinet. If you’ve used Lokinet before, you will know that addresses look something like this: 

http://dw68y1xhptqbhcm5s8aaaip6dbopykagig5q5u1za4c7pzxto77y.loki/wiki/

Not that easy to remember. With LNS, addresses can be anything. You could have net.loki, privacy.loki, or even loki.loki. This will make sharing and remembering Lokinet sites much, much easier in the future. 

We’ve already got a couple of Lokinet sites up and running that are using LNS, and you can test them out right now: 

Arweave.loki

Blocks.loki 

Get in on the action

There has never been a better time to start surfing on Lokinet. At the moment, exit functionality is live and operational on Linux and Windows, and the macOS version will be arriving shortly. 

You can grab the latest version here and start using Lokinet to secure all the internet traffic on your computer — whether it’s in your browser, an email client, or a messaging app (we’ve heard of one you might like). 

The post Lokinet gets exits: to the clearnet, and beyond! appeared first on Loki.


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Snider

Introduction

Since we started in 2017, Loki has grown exponentially. After beginning as an ambitious Monero fork, our scope has dramatically expanded into a full privacy suite: a private messaging app, an onion routing network, a private PoS cryptocurrency, and a foundation dedicated to building and supporting free, accessible, decentralised, open-source privacy tools. 

We have proven ourselves to be a community-first, transparent, development-led team. Always have been, always will be. We work for our community, and we’re always adapting to make sure we’re bringing value to the project and providing you with the best applications possible.  In recent months we announced our foray into the DeFi space with our support of Chainflip, a decentralised cross-chain asset swapping service being built on Loki. Chainflip has been met with enormous excitement and support from the Loki community, and the initial centralised version (beta) was due to be released this month.

However, recent developments in the regulatory landscape have made us pause and consider the best way forward for both Chainflip and the Loki Project. The knock-on effects of those recent regulatory developments are far-reaching, and they’ll have dramatic effects on the crypto space as a whole — so the Chainflip team has been hard at work finding the best way forward for the project. 

While the Chainflip team has been planning for their future, we’ve also had the opportunity to take a step back and consider our overall strategy at Loki. You might’ve noticed things have been unusually quiet for the last month or so. That’s because we’ve been busy behind the scenes intensely planning the next big step for Loki, and now we’re ready to share it with you. 

At Loki, we care deeply about what we’re building, the community that has helped make it possible, and the potential of all of the incredible technology already under our belt. The question we’ve been working to answer is: how can we ensure all our projects have the opportunity to reach their full potential? How can we ensure that all of our products and technologies remain relevant and growing, not just for the next year, but for the next 5 years and beyond?

What we’re announcing

Today, we’re announcing some radical changes that will future-proof the project, our product suite, and our commitment to free, open-source decentralised privacy tools. There’s a lot going on at Loki, and this is quite a dense set of announcements. We’re sure you’ll have questions after this first round of announcements, so please join CEO Simon Harman and CTO Kee Jefferys for a live community roundtable later today (Tuesday November 10) at 4pm AEDT. Simon will also be running additional AMA sessions at 10am AEDT on Wednesday November 11, and at some point on Thursday and Friday (times TBC), to ensure we can answer all your questions and respond to all your feedback throughout the week. Submit your questions through Menti or share them in our community chats and social channels — we’ll be sure to address every question we can.

With that, let’s get into the announcements!

An evolution for Loki

The word Loki is something that means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. Loki has already evolved an incredible amount over the last 3 years. Our technology stack continues to grow, with a wide range of tools and protocols that make developing decentralised secure applications much easier — not just for us, but for everyone. We’ve built Session, Lokinet, and all of the utilities on the Loki Blockchain itself, and in so doing, we’ve also built a number of libraries, protocols, and other tools to make these decentralised applications possible.

The answer to the question “What is Loki?”  depends on who you ask. Some people are deeply interested in the power of the Loki blockchain. Others see the importance and potential of Session, and will mostly describe Loki in terms of secure messaging. And some love Loki for Lokinet, and can see a bright future for  a crypto-backed competitor to Tor and VPN services. Finally, there’s Chainflip — the newest member of the family. Lots of people are super excited about the prospect of Chainflip, and for some it was the first time they’d ever heard of Loki.

The Loki Project has so much depth, so many tools, and so much utility that it can be hard to summarise all the things this project does. For those that do their research, it’s a compelling, interesting, and promising project with abundant possibility. But the feedback we’ve received suggests that to most newcomers, the Loki Project comes across as a bewildering array of seemingly unconnected products and features. The same principle applies to our current technology stack: there’s a lot there, but it’s very hard for external developers to understand, contribute to, and most importantly, leverage to their own advantage. 

Above and beyond this confusion, the Loki brand itself — while beloved in the Loki community — is seen as old and outdated by many key players in the crypto industry. To put it bluntly, this is limiting the project’s growth potential. The wider crypto market seeks out fresh brands with fresh narratives, and our marketing team has gotten bigger, better, and more capable of creating and building more compelling brands than Loki — brands like Session. Now, it’s time for us to convert our branding expertise into market capitalisation. While we love the name Loki, and we are sure many in the community do too, the name carries too many negative connotations in the wider market — connotations that make it difficult for us to reach new network participants.

Today’s announcements aim to begin the process of addressing these issues. Loki is growing and evolving, and in recognition of this evolution, the entire project is being renamed and rebranded. 

OXEN: A new era for Loki

As we’ve already said, the network we’ve built has grown, and shown that it’s easily capable of powering applications like Session and Lokinet. But the Loki Network can be a whole lot more than just the applications we’re developing.

With everything we’ve built — it’s time to hand over the keys to the Ferrari.

The tools, protocols, and libraries we’ve built can power much more than just Session and Lokinet. They can be the building blocks everyone uses to create a new wave of privacy technologies.

Of course, we’ll still be hard at work developing Lokinet and Session as well, but all of the late nights and double espressos that go into our work won’t just benefit those applications, but an entire ecosystem of development utilities. Oxen won’t just be the backbone of our products, but the fabric we all use to weave a privacy revolution.

Oxen gives developers looking to enhance their products with greater privacy and security a real package to work with. We haven’t widely talked about what we know is possible with the Oxen stack, because until more recently, that stack didn’t exist. But now, we’ve built it. Three years in, it’s mature and robust, and we’re excited to see other technology companies, projects, and communities use the Oxen stack to make things like: 

  • A truly encrypted Slack/Mattermost competitor
  • Truly encrypted voice and video call service (Yes, much better than Zoom or Jitsi, which aren’t really that well-secured at all)
  • Peer-to-peer networking replacement library for blockchain projects (much easier to deploy than libp2p, for instance, due to common features with ZMQ)
  • Onion VPN marketplace powered by Oxen
  • Secure onion-routed HTTPrequest library (onion requests) used to secure simple web traffic between client and server without requiring a VPN or OS level support
  • Redundant messaging utilising the swarm protocol (superior protocol to Bitmessage)
  • Virtual LAN functionality to enable private networks to form on the public internet (a more versatile, easier-to-use version of Hamachi)

Truthfully, this is much closer to the original vision of Loki — using staked nodes to provide services. The scope of the Oxen network isn’t limited to the potential of Session and Lokinet. While they’re great examples of some of the possible applications of the Oxen stack, so much more can be done. 

2020 has made it obvious that there is a demand for privacy in all areas of digital communication and collaboration. Zoom is the most talked-about piece of technology of the year — and it’s been widely panned for its privacy and security failings. Tools like Slack, Microsoft Teams, Discord, WebEx, and Trello have become essential to the daily operations of people around the world. These tools are useful, but their models for privacy and security are lagging behind. 

The Oxen stack is the answer to this problem. 

We’re not just talking about a few purpose-built privacy tools. We’re talking about empowering the most-used technologies in the world to become properly private and secure with relatively straightforward implementations and integrations. 

When we set out to make Session and Lokinet, this didn’t exist. We’ve had to build it ourselves, but now — everyone that comes after can stand on our shoulders. Privacy should be a non-negotiable part of modern technology, but a lot of the time it gets dumped in the too-hard basket. 

Oxen puts privacy at the fingertips of developers and users alike. And to slingshot adoption of Oxen’s tech stack into the exosphere, we’re spinning up a new business development division to create new opportunities and build relationships with developers and organisations who will benefit from leveraging Oxen’s tech stack. This active stance will radically increase adoption and use of our technologies across every sector we’re involved in, and help to ensure that both the Oxen project and the wider technology ecosystem will benefit from what we’ve built.

Over the coming days, weeks, and months, Loki will evolve into Oxen. You’ll start to see the changes rolling in as you get a taste for the new brand, new tickers pop up on places like CoinMarketCap, and a brand-spanking-new website. We’re excited to take you on the journey with us — the journey from Loki to Oxen. As Loki, we’ve already accomplished so much together, and as Oxen we’ll do even more. 

You’ve probably noticed that we haven’t mentioned Chainflip’s place in Oxen’s bold new plan just yet — and that’s because Chainflip has a bold new plan all of its own. Just like Oxen, there are lots of exciting new developments for Chainflip that we’re sharing with you today.  

What’s next for Chainflip 

The Chainflip team’s original plan was for Chainflip to be rolled out in several stages, each with decreasing levels of centralisation. That’s no longer possible, and although the initial centralised version has essentially been completed, releasing it as is would be unacceptably risky. To address this, the first version of Chainflip will now be fully decentralised — but this means extra development resources will be required to deliver Chainflip in a timely manner. Today, we’re announcing some changes which will give Chainflip the resources it needs to grow quickly, while ensuring that our major projects — Oxen, Lokinet, and Session — can continue to be developed without interruption.

Chainflip was always going to take significant work to build — and this is doubly true if it’s going to be decentralised from day one. Having said that, completion of the centralised version is still an enormous milestone for Chainflip— it will accelerate testing and development of the decentralised version. The current version has been modularised so that each of the components can be decentralised independently of one another, which means the Quoter and front-end work is already largely finished.

With that in mind, the process of building the decentralised version of Chainflip could really benefit from extended resources. The DeFi space is growing quickly, and we think Chainflip is one of the most crucial additions to the ecosystem. At the moment, there is a gap in the DeFi ecosystem — trustless asset swapping services with a positive permissionless user experience. This is a hole Chainflip will patch, and as the DeFi industry matures, it’s a gap that needs to be filled. 

We want the Chainflip team to have all the resources they need to bring a fully-fledged version of the product to market as soon as possible. Chainflip needs its own blockchain to fulfil its potential.

With its own purpose-built blockchain, Chainflip will be delivered more quickly, more completely, and be well positioned to succeed as a long term project. Although it would still be possible, using the Loki blockchain would hold Chainflip back from both a technological and regulatory perspective. We want to deliver the best version of Chainflip, and this is the best way to achieve that.

With this plan, both Oxen and Chainflip will thrive. Not only will Chainflip have everything it needs to succeed, but we won’t have to divert any resources away from Oxen or its projects like Session and Lokinet. The Oxen community will be rewarded for all of their support for the project. Further, because the Foundation has already contributed to the Chainflip project, it has negotiated with the Chainflip team to ensure that this new direction for Chainflip will be significantly beneficial for the Foundation, too.

Chainflip ICO and OXEN swapping program

Now that Chainflip is standing on its own two feet, it’s going to need its own resources. Chainflip will be completing a fundraising round in order to give itself all the tools it needs to rapidly accelerate development timelines and ensure the product is released in a fully decentralised manner with all of the proposed features.

This way, the fully realised version of Chainflip will be delivered to your doorstep as soon as possible.

Loki has been a huge supporter of Chainflip, and there are plenty of people holding Loki because of their interest in the product. Chainflip wants to recognise those people, and so in order to bootstrap its own community, the project will be offering a token burning program using LOKI/OXEN. As much as 9% of the presale supply will be made available to swap LOKI/OXEN at preferential rates for Chainflip tokens. This program will be rolled out in 3 tranches at decreasing rates in each round, meaning the sooner users participate, the better rate they’ll get per LOKI/OXEN token. There are also plans being put in place to preference current SN operators at the best swap rates in the first round of the burn in recognition of the work they provide. This swap program gives current LOKI/OXEN holders the opportunity to decide whether they want to stay involved with both Oxen and Chainflip, or merely one or the other — without having to buy any new tokens to do so.

After the successful issuance of the main Chainflip token, the LOKI/OXEN collected in this program will be publicly burned. Details on the burning program will be released in the coming weeks, as there are still some important legal questions to be answered surrounding the specifics of this program.

Chainflip is still in the early stages of fundraising, and while entities are being spun up and legal advice is being finalised, very few details can be shared publicly. Based on early conversations, and with pre-seed funding already secured, lots of work has already been completed that — depending on the outcomes of the legal advice — could allow Chainflip to close the private components of the presale by the end of the year.

For the time being, though, the only way to gain exposure to Chainflip tokens is by holding Loki and waiting for the burning program. We believe this fact will stimulate organic demand for Loki as the project makes the transition to Oxen. 

As for the 6 Loki per block that was earmarked for incentivising Chainflip liquidity,  that allocation may be retargeted to support other aspects of the project — like further incentivising Service Node operators or supporting other community projects — or possibly removed entirely. We’ll consult the community in the near future about the best way to utilise this part of the block reward going forward, and your input will be key to this decision.

Session and Lokinet: The future is bright

Meanwhile, Session and Lokinet are full steam ahead. 

Lokinet is about to get a rebrand all to itself. We’ve already mentioned this a couple of times over the last few months, but the rebrand is now getting close to being fully released. Over the years, our marketing team has gotten a lot better at building and establishing striking brands — and Lokinet is ready for a new look. On top of a completely overhauled visual identity, Lokinet will be getting a new name — just in time for the much-vaunted imminent release of exit node functionality. 

We think Lokinet’s exit node marketplace is going to solve a lot of the problems faced by current traffic-anonymising applications. Of course, Tor has long been both a bulwark and a trailblazer in the privacy community, but it suffers from crippling speed and user experience issues due to being an application-layer protocol. You can download Lokinet right now and see for yourself its speed and ease of use. Likewise, while VPNs offer convenience and ease of use — they can only offer so much protection. A plug-and-play onion routing network like Lokinet represents a huge leap forward for anonymous internet usage, and we’re actively seeking out VPN companies to plug their existing VPN infrastructure into the Oxen onion VPN marketplace, which will help bootstrap the network’s capability and bring traffic to the Oxen marketplace.

On top of this, Session is already a fully-functioning product that thousands of people are using every day. Earlier this year, we showed that we can drive huge user numbers for Session. We have the data, we know we can do it. Session already has over 400,000 downloads. Our marketing efforts were put on pause to give our Session developers some wiggle room to polish the app — but now it’s ready. Session is in the best place it’s ever been, and we’re just about ready to unleash the marketing budget and strategy that we’ve been building up for the last six months. Session is ready to become a truly mass-market messaging app, with plans in place to grow the user base to over 1,000,000 users in 2021.

Oxen will be at the vanguard of a privacy technology revolution. Session and Lokinet are proof of the incredible applications that can be built using this platform, and now the tech stack we’ve spent three years building along the way can be put to work — for the benefit of the entire privacy community. 

Of course, this is a lot of information to come out all at once. We are extremely excited about these changes, and we invite you to come and speak with Kee and Simon later today (Tuesday November 10) at 4pm AEDT on YouTube — keep an eye on our socials for a link. Simon will also be running additional AMA sessions at 10am AEDT on Wednesday November 11, and at some point on Thursday and Friday (times TBC), to ensure we can answer all your questions and respond to all your feedback. Submit your questions through Menti or share them in our community chats and social channels — we’ll be sure to address every question we can.

Welcome to Oxen. Loki, evolved.

The post Major project announcement: A bright future for Loki appeared first on Loki.


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